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@teresapalmer


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a word from teresa

Nature always reminds me to be present, to let go and to just breathe and be. The most beautiful… https://t.co/5kfj9fagrU

About a day ago from Teresa Palmer's Twitter

"I have to not take myself too seriously and I have to realise that if it is meant to be, it will be."
2:22 Movies Photo Updates

We have updated our gallery with some gorgeous stills of Teresa from 2:22. You can also expect to see screen captures from another of her recent roles in Berlin Syndrome, added very soon. Enjoy the photos!

GALLERY LINKS
Film Productions > 2:22 (2017) > Stills
Photo Updates Photoshoots

Here’s a beautiful new portrait of Teresa showing her support for the ongoing postal vote in Australia to legalize same-sex marriage. The image is part of a group of Australian celebrities (including Teresa’s good friend, Phoebe Tonkin) that have come together to support ELLE Australia’s #ELLEIsForLove campaign.

GALLERY LINKS
Photoshoots & Portraits > Sessions > Photoshoots and Portraits from 2017 > Session 002 – ELLE Australia

ELLE AUSTRALIA – Starting from the 12th of September, and running all the way to the 7th of November, Australia is conducting one of the most important, and most highly-contested votes in its history: a postal vote to legalise same-sex marriage.

After a frustrating back-and-forth regarding plebiscites and impassioned floor speeches, Australian’s government decided that a postal survey—a non-compulsory, mail-in vote—would decide whether or not a private member’s bill would be introduced on the topic (which would legalise same-sex marriage, if passed, which it is expected to). The ballots have been mailed out, and every registered Aussie is being asked the very same question, one at a time, “Should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry?”

But despite the simplicity of the question, and the same simplicity in your choice of answers—“Yes,” or “No”—the vote isn’t so straightforward as we’d hoped it would be.

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Berlin Syndrome Movies Photo Updates

We have updated the gallery with four additional hi-resolution stills from Teresa’s latest role in Cate Shortland’s Berlin Syndrome. Can’t wait to see this one!

GALLERY LINKS
Film Productions > Berlin Syndrome (2017) > Stills
Hacksaw Ridge Movies Photo Updates

I’ve updated the gallery with screen captures from the Blu-ray edition of Hacksaw Ridge. Teresa gives a moving and beautiful performance as Dorothy Schutte, it’s just a shame that her character isn’t seen again on screen during the second half of the film.

gallery links
Film Productions > Hacksaw Ridge (2016) > Blu-ray Screen Captures
Appearances Photo Updates

We’ve added some gorgeous new photos of Teresa, who was in attendance at last night’s 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles. Be sure to take a look.

gallery links
Public Appearances > Appearances from 2017 > 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards – Inside
Public Appearances > Appearances from 2017 > 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards – Red Carpet
Berlin Syndrome Movies

THE FILM STAGE – While the recent 10 Cloverfield Lane and Room told stories of captivity with various hooks — science-fiction and the process of healing, respectively — Cate Shortland’s approach in her latest, harrowing drama Berlin Syndrome makes room for more nuance and depth. Locked in a Berlin apartment, there is little hope for our protagonist for nearly the entire runtime. And while some of the story’s turns can feel overtly manipulative, Shortland finds a bracing humanity in depicting the perverse situation of Stockholm syndrome.

Attempting to figure out what she wants from life, Clare (Teresa Palmer) leaves her Brisbane home to head to Berlin where she spends her first days as a tourist photographing the architecture and meeting locals. One day at a crosswalk, she meets the initially charming, reserved Andi (Max Riemelt). After a few encounters, they go on a date and return to his secluded apartment where they make love, a scene in which Shortland’s eye for sensuality makes the revelation of the trauma to come all the more distressing. When Andi goes to his work as an English teacher the next day, Clare finds herself locked in the apartment by a deadbolt, her SIM card missing, and surrounded by reinforced windows with no hope of breaking open.

After Andi makes an excuse the first day that he forgot to leave the keys, on the second day of captivity, Clare initially attempts to reason with him. Andi’s chilling obliviousness to the clear pain he’s inflicting makes for one of the menacing villains in some time. As he offers questions about which ingredients Clare prefers in their dinner or how she’d rate their relationship on a scale from 1-10, there’s unsettling impact tied to his mannerly demeanor. An attempt at a backstory tied to his father and his estranged mother is less effective than when we simply the threat in his actions with Clare.

Palmer, with her sullen eyes, gives a miraculous performance, weaving between a layered emotional spectrum of outright physical hostility to veiled acceptance in hopes for an escape. Often unable to articulate the horrors of the situation, her subtle glances and gestures speak volumes to her determination for freedom by any means necessary. It’s no easy task for an actor to give range when inflicted by dominating hideousness for nearly two hours, but Palmer is thoroughly mesmerizing in conveying both her emotional and physical pain.

Adapted from Melanie Joosten’s novel by Shaun Grant (also behind the equally grim drama The Snowtown Murders), the reaction to the drama will correlate with how much stamina one has for witnessing pure evil. With a dynamic this unbearable to witness, Shortland imbues a complex psychology to the script through her tactile style. Shot by Germain McMicking, there’s a textured feel for both the location and the characters, often using close-ups and inserts to leave a full-bodied impression of the circumstances.

With mentions of past division in Germany surrounding the Berlin Wall, as well as other historical and literary metaphors peppered throughout, Shortland smartly never makes an overt political analogy. In this tale of female imprisonment, everything can be gleaned from the central relationship: a domineering male figure believes he has the final authority on a female’s mind and body. Berlin Syndrome was conceived within the haunting specters of the past, and it proves history will always repeat itself.

Berlin Syndrome premiered at Sundance Film Festival and will be released by Vertical Entertainment and Netflix.

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