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a word from teresa

Forest nestled right below my new @TinyTags necklace ❤️🙏It's so beautiful! I'm so grateful. My… https://t.co/LxfKnEOGol

About 12 hours ago from Teresa Palmer's Twitter

"I have to not take myself too seriously and I have to realise that if it is meant to be, it will be."
Hacksaw Ridge Movies Photo Updates

I’ve updated the gallery with screen captures from the Blu-ray edition of Hacksaw Ridge. Teresa gives a moving and beautiful performance as Dorothy Schutte, it’s just a shame that her character isn’t seen again on screen during the second half of the film.

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Film Productions > Hacksaw Ridge (2016) > Blu-ray Screen Captures
Appearances Photo Updates

We’ve added some gorgeous new photos of Teresa, who was in attendance at last night’s 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles. Be sure to take a look.

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Public Appearances > Appearances from 2017 > 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards – Inside
Public Appearances > Appearances from 2017 > 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards – Red Carpet
Berlin Syndrome Movies

THE FILM STAGE – While the recent 10 Cloverfield Lane and Room told stories of captivity with various hooks — science-fiction and the process of healing, respectively — Cate Shortland’s approach in her latest, harrowing drama Berlin Syndrome makes room for more nuance and depth. Locked in a Berlin apartment, there is little hope for our protagonist for nearly the entire runtime. And while some of the story’s turns can feel overtly manipulative, Shortland finds a bracing humanity in depicting the perverse situation of Stockholm syndrome.

Attempting to figure out what she wants from life, Clare (Teresa Palmer) leaves her Brisbane home to head to Berlin where she spends her first days as a tourist photographing the architecture and meeting locals. One day at a crosswalk, she meets the initially charming, reserved Andi (Max Riemelt). After a few encounters, they go on a date and return to his secluded apartment where they make love, a scene in which Shortland’s eye for sensuality makes the revelation of the trauma to come all the more distressing. When Andi goes to his work as an English teacher the next day, Clare finds herself locked in the apartment by a deadbolt, her SIM card missing, and surrounded by reinforced windows with no hope of breaking open.

After Andi makes an excuse the first day that he forgot to leave the keys, on the second day of captivity, Clare initially attempts to reason with him. Andi’s chilling obliviousness to the clear pain he’s inflicting makes for one of the menacing villains in some time. As he offers questions about which ingredients Clare prefers in their dinner or how she’d rate their relationship on a scale from 1-10, there’s unsettling impact tied to his mannerly demeanor. An attempt at a backstory tied to his father and his estranged mother is less effective than when we simply the threat in his actions with Clare.

Palmer, with her sullen eyes, gives a miraculous performance, weaving between a layered emotional spectrum of outright physical hostility to veiled acceptance in hopes for an escape. Often unable to articulate the horrors of the situation, her subtle glances and gestures speak volumes to her determination for freedom by any means necessary. It’s no easy task for an actor to give range when inflicted by dominating hideousness for nearly two hours, but Palmer is thoroughly mesmerizing in conveying both her emotional and physical pain.

Adapted from Melanie Joosten’s novel by Shaun Grant (also behind the equally grim drama The Snowtown Murders), the reaction to the drama will correlate with how much stamina one has for witnessing pure evil. With a dynamic this unbearable to witness, Shortland imbues a complex psychology to the script through her tactile style. Shot by Germain McMicking, there’s a textured feel for both the location and the characters, often using close-ups and inserts to leave a full-bodied impression of the circumstances.

With mentions of past division in Germany surrounding the Berlin Wall, as well as other historical and literary metaphors peppered throughout, Shortland smartly never makes an overt political analogy. In this tale of female imprisonment, everything can be gleaned from the central relationship: a domineering male figure believes he has the final authority on a female’s mind and body. Berlin Syndrome was conceived within the haunting specters of the past, and it proves history will always repeat itself.

Berlin Syndrome premiered at Sundance Film Festival and will be released by Vertical Entertainment and Netflix.

Berlin Syndrome Movies

THE PLAYLIST – Aussie filmmaker Cate Shortland, who has been behind the camera for “Somersault” and “Lore,” is a director we keep a keen eye on. However, we expected her latest film, “Berlin Syndrome,” to have popped up on the festival circuit by now. Shot all the way back in the spring of 2015, not much has been heard about the picture since that time, but we’re very excited that it will be making its World Premiere at the Sundance Film Festival next month.

Based on the book by Melanie Joosten, and starring Teresa Palmer and Max Riemelt, the dramatic thriller details a passionate holiday romance that takes an unexpected and sinister turn when an Australian photographer wakes one morning in a Berlin apartment and is unable to leave. And given Shortland’s evocative style, we have high hopes for this one.

The Sundance Film Festival runs from January 19-29, 2017.

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Film Productions > Berlin Syndrome (2017) > Stills
Lights Out Movies Photo Updates

I have updated the gallery with screen captures from the Blu-ray edition of Lights Out to the gallery. Teresa turns in yet another strong performance here, portaying fear so realistically. As for the film itself? It’s an enjoyable supernatural horror with very little gore but is still quite heavy on clichés, unfortunately. Still, it’s worth watching if you’re a fan of the genre and of course for Teresa’s performance. You can view the screen captures by clicking the links below.


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Film Productions > Lights Out (2016) > Blu-ray Screen Captures
Film Productions > Lights Out (2016) > Blu-ray Features – Deleted Scenes
Articles and Interviews

VS MAGAZINE – Teresa Palmer is living the dream. At her 2013 wedding to actor/ director Mark Webber, the couple read emails they had written to each other in the 40 days leading up to their first meeting. The exchange was initiated after the Australian actress tweeted on Webber’s film about single parenthood, The End of Love. “We got to know each other’s spirits and hearts rather than it being something physical. It felt really old school in an ironic way – like modern day love letters.”

Not everything went off without a hitch. There was that awkward first date, in which Webber left the roses he’d bought in the car, and was fidgeting, sweating and stuttering. The former model’s reaction was equally fretful. “It was so overwhelming because I knew he was my guy.”

Out of those courting emails came the idea of writing a film together, The Ever After. “It’s about what can happen when communication breaks down in a marriage. We were getting married and it was a juxtaposition of what we were going through.”

The 28-year-old’s career is on a rapid ascent. She plays a stripper in Terence Malick’s Knight of Cups, a role tailor made for Palmer by the director himself. “I was only supposed to do one scene but at the end of the day Terry asked me if I’d come back the next day. This happened for about 8 days. It was a character that wasn’t in the script and everything was ad-libbed.” She also stars alongside Simon Pegg in Australian indie comedy Kill Me Three Times. Webber nearly foiled that one though, by getting the actress pregnant. “When I called to drop out, they said they’d shoot around the bump, so I was playing an awful, murderous human being while six months pregnant.”

She thought it would be her last film for some time, but since giving birth she’s made three films without ever missing an evening with her son. It’s a testament to her dedication to her child as well as a sign that the industry is becoming more attuned to the work/home balance for actresses. Palmer’s forthcoming films are diverse: John Hillcoat’s police thriller Triple Nine, (“That was the first role I did after the birth of my child, I play Casey Affleck’s wife and he’s a cop who gets involved in some corruption”), a Nicholas Sparks-penned romantic tale The Choice, (“I was so excited by the notebook and I remember praying and praying that one day I’ll get to play a character like Allie Hamilton and this landed on my lap”) and the highly anticipated remake of Point Break (“It’s a reinterpretation of the story – it focuses on a group of eco- terrorists. Because I’m a gung-ho vegetarian in real life, the part really spoke to me. I love the idea of people taking from big corporations and pumping it into worthwhile things.”)

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Articles and Interviews Awards and Nominations

VARIETY – Two actors on the rise, Scott Eastwood and Teresa Palmer, picked up “Rising Star” awards and discussed their fast-evolving careers at the opening night of the 2015 Maui Film Festival.

Festival director Barry Rivers presented the pair their awards as part of the festival’s opening celebration. They were then interviewed onstage by Variety editor David S. Cohen before a full house at the “Celestial Cinema” outdoor theater at the Wailea Golf Club.

Eastwood proved somewhat laconic but quick with a quip, like his famous father, Clint. At 29, the younger Eastwood has already been making films for 13 years. “It’s been a helluva ride, it really has,” he said. “People don’t realize that you can make a film, and it may not be all that great of a film, but you have an amazing experience. … It’s always a great life experience.”

Palmer, who is more gregarious, recalled being randomly discovered by a teenaged Australian student filmmaker who was casting a film on youth suicide. “It premiered in 2006 at Cannes, and we had a standing ovation, and it completely changed my life. I thought I was going to have this experience and go back to working in retail.”

Both Palmer and Eastwood are transitioning from indies to major roles in high-budget studio films. Palmer called the upcoming “re-envisioning” of “Point Break,” in which she appears, “an homage to the beautiful original film, which I’m a huge fan of.” She said “it’s much more on an international scale; we filmed in 10 countries on four continents.”

But she said her own work on it “didn’t feel any different than doing a little independent Australian movie … I still had the same level of commitment. You just have to shut that out. You just have to remain focused on what you’re there to, which is tell the story of this particular character.

“I’ve learned in the last few years I just want to portray real,” she said. “If I can do a character that’s grounded in reality and find authenticity in her, then I feel like I’m doing my job.”

Of Warner’s “Suicide Squad,” Eastwood could say little, other than to say “I’m allowed to talk about the fact that I’m not allowed to talk about it.”

More generally, he said of big-budget studio films, “Sometimes … they want you to go there and hit your mark and say your lines, so you just have to do what you do and work with what they give you. You still have to be honest and do your best job.”

Asked if she had any heroes in the business, Palmer named one she had worked with: Christian Bale. “I felt like I was in acting school just being in scenes with him.

Eastwood thought carefully before discussing his own heroes. “I got one I can think of,” he quipped, before saying his real heroes are filmmakers. “Guys who are writer-directors like Quentin Tarantino and James Cameron, who have changed the history of the film business.”

Eastwood said his father’s advice, as he paid his dues in oddjobs and indies was: “Stick around. Stick around, because you just never know if it’s going to happen or if it’s not, and you’re going to have to go back to bartending or something.”

The opening night screenings, “Love and Mercy” and “Live From New York” unspooled following the Q&A, under intermittent drizzle that didn’t dampen filmgoers’ spirits.

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