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a word from teresa

"I have to not take myself too seriously and I have to realise that if it is meant to be, it will be."
Articles and Interviews Photo Updates Photoshoots

We’ve uploaded a gorgeous new photoshoot of Teresa, taken for a feature editorial in TOMBOY – from which comes an accompanying interview, which you can find below. Such incredible photos!

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Photoshoots & Portraits > Photoshoots and Portraits from 2019 > Session 002 – TOMBOY

TOMBOY – Hanging up the phone to Teresa Palmer after an hour of speaking; her end of the line in Adelaide where she shares a home with husband and director Mark Webber and her sons, and mine in TOMBOY’s satellite office in Los Angeles (where Palmer and her family spend around 60% of their time), I joked with photographer Zanita Whittington who lensed Teresa for this story, that we should title it, “Mother Teresa”

Palmer is one of Australia’s craftswomen who can safely say they have made it in Hollywood. She is also an independent publisher of wellbeing platform and digital community, Your Zen Mama and Your Zen Life, and a friend of luxury house, CHANEL. Though, her role of mother is without a doubt her starring one. All of her excitement (she is 28 weeks pregnant with her first daughter), her anxieties (negotiating with Webber for another baby after this one), and happiness is wrapped up in it. “Motherhood has been the greatest thing in my entire life and the thing that feels most like me,” she said.

Although reputably questionable, Wiki states that Palmer was in fact named after Mother Teresa. True or not – her name suits her – and like her namesake she is beautiful in spirit as well as in front of the camera, as the pictures prove.

// excerpts from our phone transcript.

[TERESA on splitting time between LA and Adelaide]

TP: We’re 60/40 at this point. 60% in LA and then 40% in Adelaide. Our little boys have school here now in Australia so we’re getting excited to start transitioning into raising the boys in Adelaide.

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Articles and Interviews

AUDI MAGAZINE – During the opening weekend of this year’s Audi Hamilton Island Race Week, actor Teresa Palmer has been announced as the brand’s newest ambassador, at a celebration marking 20 years of the Audi Australia ambassador program.

It’s a long way from Adelaide to Hollywood. Growing up in council housing, working at a burger franchise and in Adelaide’s Rundall Mall shopping centre are not the obvious prerequisites for a career in film, and yet that’s the route Teresa Palmer took to not only arrive in Hollywood, but make a name for herself and stay there.

As fairytale and as simple as it sounds, the road has not been an easy one, but despite hardship and some disappointment along the way, Teresa, named after Mother Teresa, has applied the basic principles of hard work and sheer determination. The combination, along with no small amount of obvious natural talent have paid off, and her list of film credits continues to grow and become more and more impressive, and to the actor herself, more satisfying and fulfilling.

The hard road has been as much a blessing as anything else, says Palmer, and has kept her grounded as her career has taken her to places she never dreamed of.

“When things started to happen and I was working in America, it was such a whirlwind that it felt surreal and I was just waiting for it all to end,” she says.

“I just thought I’d eventually go back to Adelaide and to my teaching degree, but then it just kept going and a few years in I realised that this was my new reality.”

And what a reality it is, the actor building an impressive and incredibly diverse body of work that has seen her explore roles from romantic comedy and drama to action and suspense, to sci-fi and horror.

She displays all of the characteristics of a true chameleon, without the need to transform her look with extensive makeup and costume, such is her talent to ‘become’ the character.

From an alien in I am Number Four, to a girl who falls for a zombie in Warm Bodies, to a woman held hostage in the phycological thriller, The Berlin Syndrome, Palmer is not likely to be typecast any time soon.

Perhaps her biggest role to date, that of Desmond Doss’ wife in Mel Gibson’s award-winning drama Hacksaw Ridge, again saw her step out of her comfort zone and in the process widespread critical acclaim and nominations for Best Actress (Australian Film Critics Association Awards), Best Actress in a Leading Role (Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts – AACTA) and Best International Supporting Actress (AACTA).

“I gravitate towards lots of different types of scripts,” she says “That lends itself to going deeper within my craft and pushing the boundaries and I think it’s in those challenging moments when you’re not feeling completely comfortable within a character that you do your best work,” says Palmer.

Every new project is chosen on its merits, whether the attraction be the script, director or the opportunity to work with the other cast members – or a combination of all three.

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Articles and Interviews

DEADLY DEAD – Over the last few years, I’ve come to admire actress Teresa Palmer’s body of work, as she’s consistently taken on intriguing projects like Knight of Cups (with Terrence Malick), Warm Bodies, and last year’s Lights Out (as I entered the interview, she mentioned that work on a script for the sequel is currently underway). Her latest project, Cate Shortland’s Berlin Syndrome, recently premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival and follows her character, Clare, after she finds herself being subtly abducted following a night of passion with Andi (Max Riemelt), a teacher who wants to keep her tucked away from the world forever after their romp.

In Park City, Daily Dead had the opportunity to speak with both Palmer and Riemelt about their experiences working on Berlin Syndrome, their collaborative relationship together and with director Shortland, and the complicated connection their characters share in the film.

Great to speak with you both, and congrats on the film. What you guys managed to create in this movie is just wonderful. We’ve seen a lot of movies with this idea of somebody being abducted, but it’s always very entrenched in this big violent act. This story really creeps up on you. Going into this, was that something you guys recognized as well?
Max Riemelt: It was, but you also never know what is going to come out in the editing. What is not shown is sometimes even more important. That’s the lesson I learned yesterday while watching the movie at the premiere. It is in a way unconventional that you don’t see sometimes the horror in the face or that certain stuff when it comes to these kinds of movies. It allows the audience to get to think for themselves, especially as you’re digging through all the details Cate put into this movie.

Teresa Palmer: There’s so much attention to detail.

Max Riemelt: Yeah, but also there’s the perspective of Clare, and that is subjective. All of this is from out of her eyes, out of her perspective, and that’s what I liked the most. To get to feel how Clare sees the world and how she could feel, might feel. You don’t get the whole information. You get to think for yourself what it might feel like to be in this terrible situation like Clare, and how you might deal with it.

Max, your character is very complicated, obviously. There are some very deeply disturbing things that happen with him, but yet, there are still these moments of kindness and he’s very charismatic, too. You can see why Clare initially wouldn’t even recognize what’s happening to her because of his likeability.
Max Riemelt: Yeah, he’s a regular human being, very complex. He’s not a stereotype at all, and I appreciated that.

Teresa Palmer: Things in this movie are not so black and white, just being a story about the captor and the captive. Life is not black and white. It’s many shades of colors. That’s the same as human beings. One of my favorite scenes, I actually only just picked it up the second time I watched it, was when we’re in the forest and it’s snowing and he has such empathy for that little boy who hurts his leg.

In a different movie, the captor wouldn’t care about someone else. In fact, he’d be irritated that someone would take his attention away from the job that he’s currently doing. You see him care about this little boy’s well-being. He’s not just an evil person. He’s a human being with layers and complexity. That’s why you understand why she falls for him in this weird way.

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Articles and Interviews Videos

Teresa talks about being Harry Potter’s first kiss and just how much pressure she felt from Daniel Radcliffe’s fans while filming ‘December Boys’.

Articles and Interviews Videos

COLLIDER – It’s been a good year for Teresa Palmer. Earlier this year, she proved to be one of the most alluring characters to be wandering around in Terence Malick‘s visionary Knight of Cups, playing a stripper who seduces and travels along with Christian Bale‘s troubled screenwriter to Las Vegas. It’s the best work the young actress has done yet, though she proved equally endearing in John Hillcoat‘s enveloping yet problematic Triple 9, where she played the wife of good-cop Casey Affleck as he chased after a gang of high-end bank robbers. She also appeared in The Choice, the latest melodramatic tale of tortured romance to be spurred from the work of Nicholas Sparks. And mind you, she’s got another three or four films coming out by the end of this year, at least one of which has the chance of Oscar attention.

While on the red carpet for this year’s CinemaCon, Palmer stopped to talk with Collider’s own Steve Weintraub about two of those projects, specifically Lights Out, the highly anticipated horror film from producer James Wan, and Hacksaw Ridge, the long awaited and frankly unlikely new directorial effort from Mel Gibson. On the former picture, which was expanded to a feature from writer-director David F. Sandberg‘s celebrated short, Palmer discussed why she liked the finished product more than the script that she originally received, and pointed out one scene that she found particularly memorable, if only because the shot – involving a tattoo-parlor neon sign – took so long to get right. After that, she switched gears to talk about Hacksaw Ridge, which she suggested might be the best film she’s worked on yet, before she went onto praise the performance of her co-star, the surpassingly talented Andrew Garfield. She was so enamored with his performance that she even inferred that he’s a lock for an Oscar win which, to be fair, he’s been long overdue for.

Lights Out will hit theaters nationwide on July 22nd, whereas Hacksaw Ridge is currently scheduled to see release sometime this Fall/Winter, in the middle of Oscar season.

Articles and Interviews

PRET-A-PORTER – Events like Women in Film’s annual Crystal + Lucy Awards — held Tuesday night at the Hyatt Regency in Century City and presented by MaxMara, BMW of North America and Tiffany & Co. — serve to empower women by celebrating the work of accomplished leading ladies in Hollywood in the fields of film, TV and media.

We decided to ask some of the guests how they would empower themselves if they could travel back in time and have a chat with their 15-year-old selves. We love the answers so much — lots of smart advice for women and girls of all ages

“That you are enough just the way you are. No bells or whistles. You don’t have to put on a façade to try and fit in. You are enough. Most women at that age — these teenagers feel less than — and that they truly can’t be themselves. They are trying to personify someone else … maybe it’s someone they see in the media, and that’s why I feel I have such a responsibility to show my true self. This industry gives off a false sense of reality in so many ways, so it’s nice to strip it bare and say, ‘Hey, this is my authentic self and you are free to be your authentic self too.’” – actress Teresa Palmer

Articles and Interviews

VS MAGAZINE – Teresa Palmer is living the dream. At her 2013 wedding to actor/ director Mark Webber, the couple read emails they had written to each other in the 40 days leading up to their first meeting. The exchange was initiated after the Australian actress tweeted on Webber’s film about single parenthood, The End of Love. “We got to know each other’s spirits and hearts rather than it being something physical. It felt really old school in an ironic way – like modern day love letters.”

Not everything went off without a hitch. There was that awkward first date, in which Webber left the roses he’d bought in the car, and was fidgeting, sweating and stuttering. The former model’s reaction was equally fretful. “It was so overwhelming because I knew he was my guy.”

Out of those courting emails came the idea of writing a film together, The Ever After. “It’s about what can happen when communication breaks down in a marriage. We were getting married and it was a juxtaposition of what we were going through.”

The 28-year-old’s career is on a rapid ascent. She plays a stripper in Terence Malick’s Knight of Cups, a role tailor made for Palmer by the director himself. “I was only supposed to do one scene but at the end of the day Terry asked me if I’d come back the next day. This happened for about 8 days. It was a character that wasn’t in the script and everything was ad-libbed.” She also stars alongside Simon Pegg in Australian indie comedy Kill Me Three Times. Webber nearly foiled that one though, by getting the actress pregnant. “When I called to drop out, they said they’d shoot around the bump, so I was playing an awful, murderous human being while six months pregnant.”

She thought it would be her last film for some time, but since giving birth she’s made three films without ever missing an evening with her son. It’s a testament to her dedication to her child as well as a sign that the industry is becoming more attuned to the work/home balance for actresses. Palmer’s forthcoming films are diverse: John Hillcoat’s police thriller Triple Nine, (“That was the first role I did after the birth of my child, I play Casey Affleck’s wife and he’s a cop who gets involved in some corruption”), a Nicholas Sparks-penned romantic tale The Choice, (“I was so excited by the notebook and I remember praying and praying that one day I’ll get to play a character like Allie Hamilton and this landed on my lap”) and the highly anticipated remake of Point Break (“It’s a reinterpretation of the story – it focuses on a group of eco- terrorists. Because I’m a gung-ho vegetarian in real life, the part really spoke to me. I love the idea of people taking from big corporations and pumping it into worthwhile things.”)

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