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Please help if you can guys, heartbreaking xx https://t.co/A8sNXrH5kx

About 13 hours ago from Teresa Palmer's Twitter

"I have to not take myself too seriously and I have to realise that if it is meant to be, it will be."
Awards and Nominations Berlin Syndrome Movies

Many congratulations to Teresa for securing a much-deserved nomination (Best Lead Actress) for her incredible performance in Berlin Syndrome! The film is nominated in seven other categories including Best Film, Best Direction, and Best Editing. You can view the full list of nominations here.

DEADLINE – The Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts has set its nominations for Oz’s highest honors in both fields. Leading the pack of AACTA Awards nominees is Lion, the 2016 Garth Davis-directed drama that scored six Oscar nominations earlier this year, including Best Picture. While this is a film that The Weinstein Co acquired in a $12M 2014 Cannes deal, and which was championed by Harvey Weinstein throughout last awards season, it was produced by UK-Australia banner See-Saw Films. In the Cannes deal, TWC had taken world rights excluding Australia and New Zealand where Transmission released in January of this year.

The film is up for 12 AACTA Awards including Best Picture for producers Iain Canning, Emile Sherman and Angie Fielder of See-Saw. Due to the release calendar, Lion actually already won two AACTA International Awards in January, one each in the Supporting categories for Dev Patel and Nicole Kidman. Both repeat with the same nominations on the Oz Academy’s home turf.

Kidman is also recognized for Top Of The Lake: China Girl — another See-Saw production which shares the distinction of being the most-nominated drama, alongside Toni Collette-starrer Blue Murder: Killer Cop, with 11 mentions each.

Elisabeth Moss too received a mention for the Top Of The Lake sequel as did director Jane Campion (see the full list of nominees below).

When Lion opened in Oz in January, it scored the biggest launch ever for an Australian indie. The film is written by Luke Davies and based on Saroo Brierley’s memoir of being lost as a child in Calcutta, his adoption by an Australian couple and his search for his biological family.

The film is co-financed by Screen Australia and was a reteam for See-Saw and TWC after 2010’s Best Picture Oscar winner The King’s Speech. The Weinstein Co has U.S. distribution rights on See-Saw’s Mary Magdalene, also directed by Garth Davis. Speculation following the recent sexual harassment and assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein and the uncertain future of TWC, is that the film ends up with another domestic distributor.

Winners of the AACTA Awards will be announced across two major events in Sydney. The Industry Luncheon takes place on December 4, and the AACTA Awards Ceremony will be held on December 6.

Articles and Interviews Awards and Nominations

VARIETY – Two actors on the rise, Scott Eastwood and Teresa Palmer, picked up “Rising Star” awards and discussed their fast-evolving careers at the opening night of the 2015 Maui Film Festival.

Festival director Barry Rivers presented the pair their awards as part of the festival’s opening celebration. They were then interviewed onstage by Variety editor David S. Cohen before a full house at the “Celestial Cinema” outdoor theater at the Wailea Golf Club.

Eastwood proved somewhat laconic but quick with a quip, like his famous father, Clint. At 29, the younger Eastwood has already been making films for 13 years. “It’s been a helluva ride, it really has,” he said. “People don’t realize that you can make a film, and it may not be all that great of a film, but you have an amazing experience. … It’s always a great life experience.”

Palmer, who is more gregarious, recalled being randomly discovered by a teenaged Australian student filmmaker who was casting a film on youth suicide. “It premiered in 2006 at Cannes, and we had a standing ovation, and it completely changed my life. I thought I was going to have this experience and go back to working in retail.”

Both Palmer and Eastwood are transitioning from indies to major roles in high-budget studio films. Palmer called the upcoming “re-envisioning” of “Point Break,” in which she appears, “an homage to the beautiful original film, which I’m a huge fan of.” She said “it’s much more on an international scale; we filmed in 10 countries on four continents.”

But she said her own work on it “didn’t feel any different than doing a little independent Australian movie … I still had the same level of commitment. You just have to shut that out. You just have to remain focused on what you’re there to, which is tell the story of this particular character.

“I’ve learned in the last few years I just want to portray real,” she said. “If I can do a character that’s grounded in reality and find authenticity in her, then I feel like I’m doing my job.”

Of Warner’s “Suicide Squad,” Eastwood could say little, other than to say “I’m allowed to talk about the fact that I’m not allowed to talk about it.”

More generally, he said of big-budget studio films, “Sometimes … they want you to go there and hit your mark and say your lines, so you just have to do what you do and work with what they give you. You still have to be honest and do your best job.”

Asked if she had any heroes in the business, Palmer named one she had worked with: Christian Bale. “I felt like I was in acting school just being in scenes with him.

Eastwood thought carefully before discussing his own heroes. “I got one I can think of,” he quipped, before saying his real heroes are filmmakers. “Guys who are writer-directors like Quentin Tarantino and James Cameron, who have changed the history of the film business.”

Eastwood said his father’s advice, as he paid his dues in oddjobs and indies was: “Stick around. Stick around, because you just never know if it’s going to happen or if it’s not, and you’re going to have to go back to bartending or something.”

The opening night screenings, “Love and Mercy” and “Live From New York” unspooled following the Q&A, under intermittent drizzle that didn’t dampen filmgoers’ spirits.

Awards and Nominations

VARIETY – Scott Eastwood and Teresa Palmer will receive the Rising Star Award at the Maui Film Festival, running June 3-7 at the Wailea Resort. The awards will be presented at the opening night at the outdoor Celestial Cinema.

Eastwood currently stars in “The Longest Ride,” adapted from the Nicholas Sparks novel, and will soon be seen in the David Ayer-directed “Suicide Squad” and the untitled Oliver Stone film about Edward Snowden. Palmer stars in the upcoming remake of “Point Break” as well as “Triple Nine” with Kate Winslet and the Terrence Malick film “Knight of Cups” with Christian Bale.

Fest director Barry Rivers founded the Maui Film Festival in 2000. Other honorees this year include Laura Dern and Colin Farrell.